WDS apprentice programme takes on ‘Aerospace Engineer in training’

UK fastener, jig and fixing specialist WDS Component Parts Ltd. has employed Sam Wilkinson as an apprentice engineer, honing his skills ready for a future role in the aerospace industry and boosting the CAD team at the company’s Leeds facility. The well-known WDS catalogue boasts over 20,000 unique parts, most of which are designed and manufactured in-house. Visitors to the WDS website are able to browse through the catalogue and download 3D CAD files for every standard part. This service is being further enhanced with animated movies exported from the design team’s CAD platform – all thanks to Sam. Chris Putman, Sales and Marketing Director for WDS, comments: “Our design and engineering capabilities are of our key strengths, so we believe that it’s vital that we invest in the future by supporting student engineers and offering apprenticeship programmes. Joining the design team, Sam is helping us to populate our CAD library and has added an extra element of flair with his animations.   “Sam is also working on our engineered services, helping to deliver bespoke parts to customers who have identified a need for specialised components. This might range from slight alterations to existing parts through to totally bespoke components designed from scratch.” Sam worked at WDS during the summer break in 2016 and became familiar with the team and the high-quality of work that’s produced, now he’s back for a one-year placement in a design engineering role, much to his delight. Sam said: “The design job at WDS is incredibly varied. Each day I’m working on a new project, often designing a completely new part for someone looking...

Peter Finegold, Head of Education and Skills at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, said in response to the Government’s careers strategy:

“Careers advice matters more for engineering than many other subjects. Our research shows that unless students come from an engineering heritage background, they are unlikely to know about it. “We strongly believe that high quality career guidance is the engine of social mobility. The UK has a particular challenge in that 50% of an individual’s lifetime earnings can be explained by their parents’ earnings. It’s 15% in Denmark. “We support the adoption of Sir John Holman’s Gatsby Good Career Guidance Benchmarks, but have real concerns that the original PwC costings (£207 million in the first year and £173 million per year thereafter) will not be met – and that we will end up with a new bureaucracy and little cultural change. “It is not sufficient simply ‘to allow providers of technical education access to pupils’. Cultural prejudices against technical education are so deeply ingrained in our society. If we are serious about developing a parity between academic and vocational learning, then we need to align careers advice much more closely with the day-to-day learning experience in schools. “We know that one of the most powerful and cost-effective ways of achieving careers-readiness for young people is through teacher placements in industry. This is why the Institution developed and funds a STEM Insight scheme, in which secondary teachers spend five or ten days in industry. STEM Insight is predicated on the fact that teachers are among the most powerful influencers of careers...
New shaft-mounted gear units are 	interchangeable with most leading makes

New shaft-mounted gear units are interchangeable with most leading makes

A new range of shaft-mounted gear units with high load carrying capacities, increased efficiency, quiet running and reliability has been launched by Renold Gears. The new F series units are dimensionally interchangeable with most leading European makes and accept standard IEC motors ensuring fast and low-cost replacement. They also feature an oil-tight gear head to keep motor replacement free from oil spills. The F Series range is suitable for most industrial applications with torque capacities up to 16,500Nm – providing low cost per Nm – power up to 110kW, and ratios from 5:1 to 100:1 in double reduction, and up to 5,600:1 in combined form. They can be supplied as double, triple, quadruple and quintuple reduction units in flange or shaft mounted execution. They are available motorised, motor ready or as a reducer with a keyed input shaft. Units in the new range have cast iron casings with an epoxy-polyester powder-coated finish for strength and durability. They are suitable for a wide range of industrial applications including mining, cement and aggregates production, and most conveying requirements, especially where heavy loads may be...

Hillhead Main Pavilion sells out in record time

With seven months still to go until Hillhead 2018 opens its doors next June, the organisers have announced that the show’s Main Pavilion is now officially sold out. With 97% of outdoor space already allocated and stands also selling quickly in the recently extended Registration Pavilion, companies interested in exhibiting are advised to enquire within the next few weeks to avoid disappointment. Event director Richard Bradbury commented: ‘We have had an overwhelming response to next year’s show both from existing customers wanting to rebook and from new enquiries looking to exhibit with us for the first time. Hillhead 2018 is set to be the largest edition to date, hosting more than 500 exhibitors for the first time.’...

Government’s Industrial Strategy

Dr Colin Brown, Director of Engineering at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, said in response to the launch of the Government’s Industrial Strategy: “The Government’s Industrial Strategy makes some positive recommendations, with regards to investing in skills and innovation in particular.   “Government needs now to show joined up thinking on how we can deliver on these ambitions. While it is welcome that Government is providing £406 million to help address the shortage of Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) skills, it is vital that this funding is made in the right places. Currently few schools are integrating engineering into their teaching and the wider school culture, which is leading to students developing a vague and incoherent understanding of the profession, its career opportunities and what it does for society. With Brexit on the horizon and the ticking time-bomb of the retiring baby-boomer generation of engineers, it has never been more important to think seriously about how to find, inspire and nurture the engineers of tomorrow ― how we frame engineering in mainstream school education rather than simply relying on serendipity and volunteerism to inspire the next...

British Safety Council opens office in India to help save lives

British Safety Council opens an office in Mumbai, with NIST Institute as its strategic partner Today, the British Safety Council, one of the world’s most trusted leaders in health, safety and environmental management, has opened its office in Mumbai, which will serve the Indian market. The British Safety Council’s vision is that no-one should be injured or made ill at work. It believes that workers have a fundamental right to return home fit and well each day. The organisation works with companies of all sizes and in all sectors to help them achieve this aspiration, while promoting the business case for investment in proportionate health and safety management. In India, where around 80% of the estimated 465 million-strong workforce are not protected by the existing health and safety legal framework, the British Safety Council hopes to raise awareness of the importance of health and safety. It will also challenge traditional views and approaches, and support employers in adopting practices which better safeguard the health and safety of their workers.   In India:   Overall workplace deaths are twenty times higher than in UK,   24% of these fatalities are in construction sector, ​  80 % of India’s workforce is still employed in an unsafe environment,   Only 20 % of India’s workforce are covered under the existing health and safety legal framework, ​ There is just one factory inspector for 506 registered factories (sources: see the attached document: Business Case).     The construction industry, which is the second largest employer of workforce in India, contributes to 24.20% of all occupational fatalities, the highest in the country annually. In comparison,...

British Safety Council responds to the Stevenson-Farmer review into workplace mental health

The British Safety Council has responded to the recommendations of the review into workplace mental health, commissioned by the Prime Minister on 9 January 2017 and led by Paul Farmer, chief executive of Mind, and Dennis Stevenson. They were published today in the report ‘Thriving at Work’. The review makes recommendations on how employers can support all employees including those with poor mental health so they remain in the workplaces and thrive. The review also urges employers to adopt six mental health standards that would act as cornerstones of good mental health practice and culture.   Louise Ward, Communications and Policy Director at the British Safety Council, said: “It is our vision that no-one should be injured or made ill at work. Great progress has been made on addressing safety issues and reducing accidents and injuries in the workplace, but there is still significant work to be done on wellbeing and health, particularly mental health. “Mental health is very much the issue of our time and there is still much to be done in dispelling the stigma that surrounds the subject and facilitating access to help and support. Defining and contextualising mental wellbeing, as distinct from mental ill health, and recognition of the multitude of contributory factors is particularly helpful, as it establishes the scope for the recommendations, and confirms that good work is a positive contributor to mental wellbeing. “In recent months, we have seen increasing publicity and awareness of the human impact of mental ill health, but the statistics included in the report from the Deloitte review (www.deloitte.co.uk/MentalHealthReview) clarify the extent of the problem and demonstrate a...

Schaeffler extends Executive Board

At its meeting on October 5, 2017, the Presiding Committee of the Supervisory Board of Schaeffler AG accepted the proposal of the Board of Managing Directors to separate the Automotive Aftermarket from the Automotive division of Schaeffler AG and to set it up as a stand-alone division, as of January 1, 2018. As a consequence the Schaeffler Group will divide its business into three divisions – Automotive OEM, Automotive Aftermarket and Industrial. On that basis the Supervisory Board of Schaeffler AG decided to appoint Mr. Michael Söding (55) to become Member of the Board of Managing Directors, effective January 1, 2018. From there on he assumes responsibility for the Automotive Aftermarket business on board level. Michael Söding has been Head of Automotive Aftermarket within Automotive division since 2009. He holds a degree in business and engineering from Darmstadt Technical University. Prior to joining Schaeffler Group he served among others at Pirelli Germany and Exide Automotive Batterie GmbH in various management positions. Georg F. W. Schaeffler, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Schaeffler AG, said: “With the appointment of Michael Söding we have again promoted an internal top manager to become Member of the Board of Managing Directors of Schaeffler AG. In the last years Michael Söding has contributed significantly to successfully develop our Automotive Aftermarket business. With his experience and know-how across technological, operational and strategic issues he will enrich the Executive Board. On behalf of the Supervisory Board I wish Mr. Söding all the best and every success in his new...

Power Jacks new office in heart of England

Lifting and positioning specialist Power Jacks has established a Business Development Office in England to bolster its links to new and existing clients in a key market. It has also appointed a Business Development Manager for the UK, Robert Stanley, who will operate from the company’s new Midlands office. The base, at Birmingham Business Park, not only positions Power Jacks to enhance its strategic service offering to clients across England but also adds fresh impetus to its long-term growth plans. “This is an important move by the business that significantly strengthens our presence in the wider UK market,” says Bruce Bultitude, Chairman and owner of Aberdeenshire-headquartered Power Jacks. “We aim to capitalise on this investment by nurturing and growing existing business relationships as well as developing new ones in the Midlands and beyond.  “Critically, it also provides us with an ideal platform from where we can showcase the strength, precision and reliability of our diverse product portfolio – as well as the quality of our service provision – to an even wider industry audience.” Power Jacks designs and manufactures quality industrial lifting and positioning equipment for clients internationally. Managing director Keith Mackie says: “Power Jacks has a long track record of meeting client needs swiftly and efficiently, in a wide variety of industrial sectors across England. The establishment of this new office simply reinforces our capabilities in that respect. “We’re pleased that Robert has joined us to head up our UK-wide business development effort. He is a highly experienced industry professional with proven technical and commercial skills, and he shares our ambitions for the business and for our clients.”...

When the worst day of someone else’s life becomes part of your job

British Safety Council supports 31 Hours, a play about suicide and mental health on the UK rail network The British Safety Council has endorsed the production of 31 Hours at The Bunker Theatre in London recognising the importance of its subject – the reluctance and inability of men in ‘macho’ jobs and work environments to talk about their concerns and their feelings. The outcome is devastating: ​-       Every 31 hours, someone takes their own life on the railways in the UK rail network. –       It is ten times more likely to be a man. 31 Hours is a story of four men who clean up after rail suicides. We observe them at work and when they return home. We watch as they deal with their own lives and their problems. In their own way. On their own. Silently. It is a story of four men failing to talk. Filled with humour and humanity, the play takes us on a high-speed kaleidoscopic journey through masculinity, mental health and messy aftermaths in modern Britain. The British Safety Council has recently unveiled its mental health training portfolio to help businesses and their employees start conversations about mental health issues and build a positive mental health culture. On the 17 October, the staff of the British Safety Council watched the performance of 31 Hours. In the Q&A session afterwards, Louise Ward, Communications and Policy Director at the British Safety Council, spoke to Kieran Knowles, the author of the play, and answered the questions from the audience about issues explored by the play. Louise previously worked for four years at Network Rail as Head of Health...
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The one leading voice for the Fluid & Power Transmission Industry - Saturday, December 16th 2017
****ISSUE 81 - DEADLINE DATES - EDITORIAL & PICS 10/11 - ADVERTISING A/W 17/11 -PUBLICATION DATE W/C 13/12****