3D print filament and printing service

Tom Krause, product manager for iglidur® Tribo-Filament, presents the igus® wear-resistant, tribopolymer filament for 3D printing. With three iglidur® materials available – I170-PF, I180-PF and J260-PF – engineers can now select and print their own prototypes, small batches and test components. As well as providing the filament, igus® offers a 3D printing service for those who do not own a 3D printer. 3D printing materials such as iglidur® tribo filaments can be processed on any 3D printer that uses the FDM method. Accordingly, any method to ensure the adhesion of ABS filaments to the printer bed can then also be used for iglidur® 3D printer filaments....

Full scale Bridge to be built in Amsterdam using Robots printing in 3D

Dutch designer Joris Laarman has designed a pedestrian bridge for Amsterdam that will be 3D printed by robots (+ slideshow). The ornate metal structure, which will span a canal in the Dutch city, will be printed in-situ by robotic arms. The location of the bridge will be announced soon and completion is set for 2017. The versatile six-axis robots – which are able to rotate their arms along six different planes of movement – will print a load-bearing structure that will support their own weight as they work. This will allow them to start on one bank of the canal and work their way across to the other side, printing steel as they go. “This bridge will show how 3D printing finally enters the world of large-scale, functional objects and sustainable materials while allowing unprecedented freedom of form,” said Laarman. “The symbolism of the bridge is a beautiful metaphor to connect the technology of the future with the old city, in a way that brings out the best of both worlds.” The project has been developed by MX3D, a technology startup launched by Joris Laarman Lab to investigate ways of printing large, sophisticated structures. It builds on technology developed by Laarman that allows industrial robots to “draw” metal structures in the air. This potentially allows far larger structures to be printed than are currently possible, and means the technology can start to move out of the factory and onto the construction site....

KU e-Racing team uses 3D printing to produce race-ready car parts

Although the world’s largest car manufacturers turned to rapid prototyping to develop ready-to-use prototypes of various car parts ranging from engine components to interior details decades ago, the technology has since become dramatically cheaper and increasingly more accessible for smaller businesses and institutions including schools. Among others who have turned to additive manufacturing to develop ready-to-use car parts includes Kingston University’s electric car racing team (KU e-Racing). After having already established themselves as a leader in the production of electric race cars since being established in 2012, the south London-based team were named the United Kingdom’s highest scoring Formula Student electric team in the annual Formula Student race at Silverstone in both 2013 and 2014. During the past three years, the company has produced two car designs that each have their own unique features. The first design used a number of metal parts and an air-intake that required a constant running pump that needed replacing frequently due to overheating. The second design featured a number of parts that were produced using 3D printing in an effort to help reduce the total weight of the car and ultimately, improve the acceleration and speed performance. “Additive manufacturing was an obvious means of reducing the weight of the car,” explains Aldus von der Burg, team leader at KU e-Racing. “By replacing metal parts with extremely tough, yet very lightweight 3D printed plastic components, we were able to decrease the overall weight of the car. With the precision of 3D printing, we could design, 3D print and test parts that directly fit the car and can endure the strain of motor-racing.” Using a...

British Royal Navy warship HMS Mersey tests 3D printed drone at sea

While we see quite a lot of 3D printed drones pass by, most of those are just fun toys rather than military machines. And yet the British navy has just shown us that 3D printed drones can definitely be a tremendous military asset. Last Tuesday, British warship HMS Mersey set out off the south coast of England with the express purpose of testing a 3D printed drone. While a simple plastic device you and I could assemble, the British navy are seriously considering incorporating 3D printed drones into the warship arsenal for autonomous flying missions in emergency situations. Granted, this 3D printed drone was slightly larger than we normally come across, but that doesn’t make this application less impressive. Weighing approximately three kilograms and featuring a typical airplane design, this cheap drone was 3D printed on shore, assembled aboard the warship, and catapulted into the sky by a three-meter wide catapult. This drone flew autonomously between a few programmed points at sea for about five minutes, before being piloted to a safe landing on the pebbly beach nearby. As Geoff Hayward, the UAV desk officer at the Maritime Warfare Centre, explained, this little project was meant to demonstrate how disposable, very cheap drones can be manufactured and quickly programmed onboard a warship. They can, he says, be adapted by the crew members to suit new missions they come across, for instance during natural disasters. Hayward was also present at the test, and argued that conventional mass production techniques aren’t flexible or affordable enough for manufacturing drones in small numbers aboard a ship. 3D printers, obviously, are far more suitable....

First metal 3D printed bicycle frame

Renishaw, the UK’s only manufacturer of a metal-based additive manufacturing machine that prints metal parts, has collaborated with a leading British bicycle design and manufacturing company to create the world’s first 3D printed metal bike frame. Empire Cycles designed the mountain bike to take advantage of Renishaw’s additive manufacturing technology, allowing them to create a titanium frame that would be both strong and light using topological optimisation – the new frame is some 33% lighter than the original. The frame has been additively manufactured in titanium alloy in sections and bonded together. This offers a number of advantages: Design freedom Rapid iterations; flexibility to make design improvements right up to production Ability to make shapes derived by topological optimisation (see below) Ultimate customisation and tailoring – make one-offs as easily as production batches Construction Complex shape with internal strengthening features Hollow structures Built in features, such as the rider’s name Performance, titanium alloy Seat post bracket 44% lighter than aluminium alloy version Extremely strong – tested to EN 14766 Corrosion resistant and long lasting  Empire Cycles Empire Cycles is a unique British bike designing and manufacturing company in the North-West of England. Passionate about using great British engineering to create elite products, the Company offers innovative designs to the world’s mountain bikers and downhillers. From the Greek word for place, ‘topo’, topological optimisation software is the term given to programs that are used to determine the “logical place” for material – normally using iterative steps and finite element analysis. Material is removed from areas of low stress until a design optimised for load bearing is evolved. The resulting model...
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The one leading voice for the Fluid & Power Transmission Industry - Saturday, December 16th 2017
****ISSUE 81 - DEADLINE DATES - EDITORIAL & PICS 10/11 - ADVERTISING A/W 17/11 -PUBLICATION DATE W/C 13/12****