Advanced Engineering UK

Advanced Engineering UK – The world of advanced engineering MULTIPLE SHOW ZONES & OPEN CONFERENCES under ONE GIANT ROOF The UK’s largest annual advanced engineering trade show & conference Official 2014 SHOW VIDEO   Integrating multiple show exhibit zones with the UK’s largest free-to-attend engineering Conference programme, Advanced Engineering is the must-attend event where the supply chain meet with visiting engineering & procurement decision makers from OEMs and top tier organisations spanning: Aerospace; Automotive; Motorsport; Marine, Civil Engineering, and more. Whether you are a visitor or an exhibitor, Advanced Engineering will not only provide you with a business forum and supply chain showcase for your own sector, but will also introduce you to new opportunities in industries using related technologies and...

It’s ‘Go Go Go’ For Formula 1 in schools ‘Qualifying’

EAL Pupils on Starting Grid for ‘Landmark’ career step British school pupils are on the starting grid for a great career in engineering, with specialist awarding organisation EAL giving a green light to a new deal with F1 in Schools. Youngsters aged between 15 and 18, who attend over 2000 schools participating in F1 in Schools , will be in pole position for a Level 1 Foundation Certificate F1 in Schools is a national and international competition that tasks teams of students to design, test, manufacture and race a scale model  Formula 1 car. The programme is run in over 44 countries with regional and national finals events. Winners from each National Final compete at the highest level, the F1 in Schools World Finals, vying for the F1 in Schools World Champions title, the Bernie Ecclestone World Champions trophy, scholarships to City University London and bursaries for UCL Mechanical Engineering. Specialist awarding organisation EAL is pioneering a raft of new initiatives to drive vocational pathways to work in to schools – giving younger pupils the tools that they need to embark on a rewarding career.   The deal is the first struck by the company’s new Head of Commercial Development; Natalie Wilson. Natalie stated, “EAL’s partnership with F1 in Schools reflects our determination to drive vocational qualifications in to the classroom,” and continued, “Every pupil taking part in this truly inspirational competition will have the chance to gain a meaningful qualification which could set them off on the right track in life.” EAL, which specialises in engineering and building services, recently unveiled a portfolio of schools qualifications, which would...

Full scale Bridge to be built in Amsterdam using Robots printing in 3D

Dutch designer Joris Laarman has designed a pedestrian bridge for Amsterdam that will be 3D printed by robots (+ slideshow). The ornate metal structure, which will span a canal in the Dutch city, will be printed in-situ by robotic arms. The location of the bridge will be announced soon and completion is set for 2017. The versatile six-axis robots – which are able to rotate their arms along six different planes of movement – will print a load-bearing structure that will support their own weight as they work. This will allow them to start on one bank of the canal and work their way across to the other side, printing steel as they go. “This bridge will show how 3D printing finally enters the world of large-scale, functional objects and sustainable materials while allowing unprecedented freedom of form,” said Laarman. “The symbolism of the bridge is a beautiful metaphor to connect the technology of the future with the old city, in a way that brings out the best of both worlds.” The project has been developed by MX3D, a technology startup launched by Joris Laarman Lab to investigate ways of printing large, sophisticated structures. It builds on technology developed by Laarman that allows industrial robots to “draw” metal structures in the air. This potentially allows far larger structures to be printed than are currently possible, and means the technology can start to move out of the factory and onto the construction site....

Schaeffler and KIT research new assisted steering system for electric vehicles

A collaborative project between automotive engine component and system supplier Schaeffler and the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT), Germany, is researching new technologies for improving the energy efficiency of assisted steering systems on electric vehicles. In conventional vehicles, the internal combustion engine not only accelerates the car but also supplies power to on-board assist systems, including the assisted steering system, which reduces the strain on the driver at the wheel. In electric vehicles, this energy comes from the battery, which as a result also reduces the vehicle’s traveling range. Set up in January 2015 and funded by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF) to the value of approx. 600,000 euros over three years, the focus of the ‘Intelligent Assisted Steering System with Optimum Energy Efficiency for Electric Vehicles (e²-Lenk)’ project is to improve the energy efficiency of steering systems by intelligently controlling the drive torque transmitted to each of the four wheels of the vehicle. As project managers Dr. Marcel Mayer of Schaeffler and Dr. Michael Frey of KIT explain: “The new assisted steering system would require fewer system components in an electric vehicle, which would mean savings in terms of weight and energy. This, in turn, would mean that an electric car would be cheaper and have a greater traveling range.” Due to the optimised design and weight reduction of the vehicle, savings would also be made in terms of reduced materials and vehicle production costs. The basic idea of the e²-Lenk project is simple: the wheels in an electric car would be driven individually by electric motors, unlike a car with an internal combustion engine,...

More women engineers urgently needed

Thousands of female engineers will be trained up as part of a ‘national mission’ to get Britain building again, Ed Miliband was quoted to say. Responding, Michelle Richmond from the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) said: “It’s great to see that Ed Miliband is making plans to tackle the engineering skills shortage. This is a very significant problem, contributing to skills shortages which damage the economy. The shocking reality is that the UK is missing out on half its potential engineering and technology workforce by failing to attract women into the industry. It also means that women are losing out on interesting and rewarding career opportunities. “The difficulty in attracting women into engineering is down to a combination of things: from the careers advice girls are given in schools, to schools not instilling girls with the confidence to opt for science and maths at A-level, through to employers needing to do more to make their approach to recruitment and retention more female friendly. “There is no easy fix to this problem so it’s important that any future training programmes are developed in close consultation with industry, schools and colleges if we want them to make a real and lasting impact. “The lack of inspirational engineering role models for girls is also part of the problem so we must make sure we show the next generation that engineering is an interesting and challenging career choice, which is why initiatives like our Young Woman Engineer of the Year Awards are so important.” Robert Beahan Institution of Engineering and Technology...
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The one leading voice for the Fluid & Power Transmission Industry - Saturday, December 16th 2017
****ISSUE 81 - DEADLINE DATES - EDITORIAL & PICS 10/11 - ADVERTISING A/W 17/11 -PUBLICATION DATE W/C 13/12****