Introducing a new paradigm in Comau Robotics

Comau, the worldwide leader in automatic and flexible manufacturing systems that increase efficiency and optimize productivity, introduces a new high-speed, 6-axis articulated robot featuring a payload of 3kg and a reach of just 630 mm. The third robot within the award-winning Racer family, Racer3 is Comau’s response to the growing market demand for fast, cost-effective robotic automation within small to medium-sized enterprises and emerging countries. With a streamlined design and brushed metal exterior, the new powerhouse of a robot unites beauty and speed with absolute precision and repeatability. Built from high-strength aluminum, the newest paradigm in Comau robotics weighs just 30kg and can be easily mounted on benches, walls, ceilings or on inclined supports. It’s also destined to be the fastest in its class according to preliminary prototype tests. Even its elegant color scheme sets it apart from the trustworthy red Comau giants that have faultlessly served high-end industrial manufacturing for close to 40 years. Leveraging Comau’s longstanding experience in the automotive industry, where accuracy and reliability are non-negotiable, the new Racer3 combines field-proven technology and enhanced dexterity with a keen focus on safety, design and product aesthetics. With a compact design, aluminum construction, exceptional stability and a user-friendly control interface, Racer3 is a highly efficient manipulation and assembly solution that can adapt to any environment. This means that SMEs in virtually any industry can easily automate, with extreme accuracy, precision and intelligence, even the most delicate manufacturing processes. The balanced volume and sleek lines of the new Racer3 robot combine speed, strength and stiffness within a highly compact and lightweight package. Created for general industry sectors, including Food...

Climbing in space

mayr® power transmission develop mini brake for robot joints   The robust, energy-efficient climbing robot SpaceClimber is designed for missions in challenging territory. Essential parts of its structural system are the intelligent, powerful joints. mayr® power transmission have developed a mini brake especially designed for such a joint. It impresses users with its small dimensions and increases the robot’s energy efficiency. This robot system is being further developed at the German Research Centre for Artificial Intelligence (Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz, DFKI).   In future, the intention is for it to explore planets independently and be able to set up an infrastructure using its gripping arms – the new multi-arm walking robot that is currently being developed by scientists at the Robotics Innovation Centre at the German Research Centre for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). The robot, which resembles a praying mantis, has been created within the context of the LIMES project, which is to continue until the end of April 2016 and which is supported by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR). Thanks to its morphology and the different walking patterns for different soil conditions, it will be capable to cope with craters and boulder fields and manipulate these with its front legs. By learning from its experiences, it will be able to act in a targeted manner. With its locations in Kaiserslautern, Saarbrucken, Bremen and Berlin, the German Research Centre for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) is the largest research centre for artificial intelligence worldwide. Role model: The ant An already tried-and-tested space robot by the DFKI and one of the predecessors of the LIMES project...

COMAU’S NEWEST ROBOT WITH AN ELEVATED PAYLOAD

With a load capacity of 650kg and reach of 2.70 meters, the new SMART NJ 650 completes the range of Comau robots dedicated to applications requiring strength and a high reach The Comau family of robots has added a new model, SMART NJ 650, with an elevated payload to complete its range of high payload robots. The new machine surpasses the previous version, SMART NJ 500, and was designed to meet the market’s need for robots than can efficiently manipulate components of significant size and weight. From a technical point of view, the robot can handle a payload of up to 650 kg, has a maximum horizontal reach of 2.70 meters and ISO 9283 repeatability from 0.15 mm. Like Comau’s other heavy load and high reach robots, the SMART NJ 650 is characterized by high stiffness, a compact, space-saving design and an optimized load capacity / payload relationship. The SMART NJ 650 is perfect for multiple industrial applications, including handling, spot welding of large body parts for the automotive sector, and the manipulation of heavy components for machine tending operations, as well as palletising, deburring and polishing, packaging and machining in general. It can be also be deployed within the food & beverage industry, foundry operations or virtually any other industrial sector. Arturo Baroncelli, Segments Management Director at Comau, says, “The new SMART NJ 650 allows us to expand and strengthen our presence in market segments that need to process heavy pieces. It also enables us to respond to new production areas that increasingly require robots with a large payload capacity.”...

Rebecca Saunders, Warwick Mobile Robotics

A student’s insight to studying engineering, building search and rescue robots and encouraging women into the field. By Karen Whittaker How did you become interested in engineering? “As a child I didn’t know which career I wanted to pursue and for that reason I chose a broad set of A-level subjects including Maths, Physics, Music and French. Maths and Physics were my favourites but I couldn’t decide what to study at university. I hadn’t really considered engineering as it wasn’t a subject taught at school. My A-level physics teacher recommended that I took part in a course called Headstart. This is a weeklong course aimed at 16-18 year olds and is available at selected universities. This course is designed to provide an insight into studying engineering at university. After completing my course at Durham University I decided to study for a degree in engineering. I applied to several different institutions and accepted an offer from the University of Warwick”. What attracted you to the University of Warwick and the course you are doing? “Although I had completed a Headstart course I still didn’t know which stream of engineering to study. The University of Warwick offers engineering degrees where the first two years are common for all streams, allowing students to experience a wide range of disciplines before specialising. This was the main reason I chose Warwick over other universities. Warwick is well known for both its teaching excellence and research achievements and was consequently awarded University of the Year 2015 in The Times Good University Guide. It’s a great place to study with a beautiful campus and more societies...

Another first for Warwick Mobile Robotics

New miniature rescue robot Warwick Mobile Robotics (WMR) is an on-going group research project carried out by a team of fourth year undergraduate students at the University of Warwick. This project is jointly run by the School of Engineering and Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG). WMG are an institution within the University of Warwick, dedicated to improving organisational competitiveness through the application of technological innovation. maxon motor uk have been involved with WMR on several projects and are delighted to sponsor the team again for 2015. This year the project is being run by eight final year Engineering students This year the project is being run by eight final year Engineering students as part of their MEng Engineering degree. The students each bring different backgrounds to the project, including students on degree streams from Electrical and Systems Engineering to Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering. Each year a team develops an urban search and rescue (USAR) robot designed to navigate disaster zones such as a collapsed building. The purpose of the robot is to locate and help victims using tele-operation, removing emergency service personnel from unnecessary danger. An advantage of an M-USAR is that it is able to fit into smaller areas This year the WMR team are developing a completely new miniature urban search and rescue (M-USAR) robot. An advantage of an M-USAR is that it is able to fit into smaller areas inaccessible by emergency personnel, allowing better exploration of a hazardous environment. When complete, a rescue robot on this scale will be a first for the University of Warwick. In past years WMR have attended the European RoboCup Competition....
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The one leading voice for the Fluid & Power Transmission Industry - Saturday, December 16th 2017
****ISSUE 81 - DEADLINE DATES - EDITORIAL & PICS 10/11 - ADVERTISING A/W 17/11 -PUBLICATION DATE W/C 13/12****